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The Difference Between Independent And Divisional Cavalry





The main difficulty in seeing the distinction between Independent and
Divisional Cavalry consists in our forgetting that we have different
kinds of organizations in the army as well as we have anywhere else. Let
us clearly understand this:

(1) An Infantry Division is composed of nine regiments of infantry, two
of artillery, and one of cavalry.

(2) A Cavalry Division is composed of nine regiments of cavalry, one
regiment of horse artillery, and no infantry.

The cavalry attached to an Infantry Division is, in general, called
Divisional Cavalry. It operates at but comparatively short distances
from its division, its duties being of a somewhat local nature.

The Independent Cavalry, because it can move so rapidly, is sent far in
advance (thirty, forty, or even fifty or more miles) of the main army to
obtain general information, such as the approximate strength and
location of the enemy's forces. The Division Commander, since he is so
far away from the Commanding General of the army in rear, and since he
has broad general duties to perform, must of necessity have broad powers
and, in general, be permitted to act as the occasion demands. He is,
therefore, said to act independently, and his cavalry is called
Independent Cavalry.





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