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The Land Forces Of The United States





You now are, or expect to become, a member of the land forces of the
United States. Of what do the land forces of the United States consist?
They consist of the Regular Army, the Volunteer Army, the Officers'
Reserve Corps, the Enlisted Reserve Corps, the National Army, the
National Guard in the service of the United States and such other land
forces as Congress may authorize.

The land forces are grouped under two general heads:

(1) The Mobile Army.
(2) The Coast Artillery.

The Mobile Army. The mobile army is primarily organized for offensive
operations against an enemy, and on this account requires the maximum
degree of mobility. (Field Service Regulations.) It consists of:

Infantry.
Field Artillery.
Cavalry.
Engineers.
Signal Corps Troops.

The Coast Artillery. The coast artillery is charged with the care and
use of the fixed and movable elements of the land and coast
fortifications. (Field Service Regulations.)

The President of the United States is the Commander-in-Chief of the
Army. He exercises his command through the Secretary of War. The Chief
of Staff acts as military adviser to the Secretary of War. He puts into
effect the Administration's wishes.

For the purpose of equipping, inspecting, directing, and administering
to the Army, there are the following corps and departments:

(1) General Staff Corps.
(2) Adjutant General's Department.
(3) Inspector General's Department.
(4) Judge Advocate General's Department.
(5) Quartermaster Corps.
(6) Medical Department.
(7) Ordnance Department.
(8) Bureau of Insular Affairs.
(9) Signal Corps.
(10) Engineer Corps.

The following are the grades of rank and commands of officers and
noncommissioned officers:

(1) General Commands: Armies.
(2) Lieutenant-General Commands: Field Army.
(3) Major-General Commands: Division.
(4) Brigadier-General Commands: Brigade.
(5) Colonel Commands: Regiment.
(6) Lieutenant-Colonel Second in command in a Regiment.
(7) Major Commands: Battalion.
(8) Captain Commands: Company.
(9) First Lieutenant Commands: Platoon.
(10) Second Lieutenant Commands: Platoon.
(11) Veterinarian He has no command.
(12) Cadet at United States Military Academy He has no command.
(13) Sergeant-Major (Regimental) He has no command.
(14) Ordnance Sergeant He has no command.
(15) Quartermaster Sergeant He has no command.
(16) Sergeant-Major (Battalion) He has no command.
(17) First Sergeant Commands: Platoon.
(18) Sergeant Commands: Sometimes a Platoon.
(19) Corporal Commands: Squad.





Next: Articles Of War

Previous: Department Commander's Report



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