Arrest Of T A Menzier And Expose Of A Prominent Railroad Official





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Baltimore, Dec. 4, 1864.



Capt. W. H. Wiegel,

Asst. Provost Marshal.



Captain.--I have the honor to report that by direction of

General Wallace, I arrested Mr. T. A. Menzier and locked him

up in this jail, and ordered the officer of the Navy that was

in company with him, Surgeon L. J. Draper, of the

Receiving-Ship "Princeton," Philadelphia Harbor, to report to

you at ten o'clock A. M. to-day. These parties were in town

yesterday morning and intend to return to Philadelphia this

evening; neither of them had papers. Menzier's sister, at

whose house I arrested them is a rebel.



The rebs were having a grand jubilee over his visit. The

Doctor had no arms.



I am, Captain,

Very respy. your obdt. servt,

H. B. SMITH,

Lt. & Chief.







I found in this house a number of prominent citizens, among whom was a

very high officer in a big railroad company. He begged me not to report

his presence, with which request I complied, in my written report, but

did not, of course, fail to report verbally to General Wallace. This man

was in confidential relations with the departments at Washington.



Menzier was a Rebel assistant surgeon. Both were turned over to

Commodore Dornin, for the Navy's disposition.





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Baltimore, Dec. 5, 1864.



Capt. W. H. Wiegel,

Asst. Provost Marshal,

8th Army Corps.



Captain.--I have the honor to report that I confined Barton R.

Zantzinger, from the Rebel Army.



Herewith I hand you his statement, which places Mr. Milnor

Jones in a worse fix than ever. Perhaps this corroborative

evidence will be sufficient to convict Jones of blockade

running.



I think Zantzinger should be detained as a witness, if for

nothing else.



I am Captain,

Very respy. your obdt. servt,

H. B. SMITH,

Lt. & Chief.









Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Baltimore, Dec. 6, 1864.



Capt. W. H. Wiegel,

Asst. Provost Marshal,

8th Army Corps.



Captain.--I have the honor to report the arrest of John Henry

Skinner Quinn, alias J. Y. Plater, alias Simpson, on charge of

being a spy.



I hand you two sworn statements that he made to me, also his

memorandum book in which is a partial description of his first

visit to Baltimore, also some entries, some of which he

explains in his statement. I also hand you his furlough, which

he said he did not have, in his first statement.



On this trip he registered at Miller's Hotel as "Simpson." On

23d April last, he registered at same hotel as John Y. Plater.



You can see by his statements that he tries to conceal the

Rebel sympathizers of this Department, and some he positively

refuses to name, but asks me to kill him, and not ask him any

more questions.



He came to this office to report as a Rebel deserter, but when

he found that I had been on his track, he owned up, but

refused to implicate his friends.



I am, Captain,

Very respy. your obdt. servt.,

H. B. SMITH,

Lt. & Chief.





As General Wallace had said, it was our duty to ascertain by every

means, the status of all persons; our archives were crowded with

information, which materially helped us to avoid the dilemma General

Schenck described.





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Baltimore, Dec. 7, 1864.



Capt. W. H. Wiegel,

Asst. Provost Marshal,

8th Army Corps.



Captain.--I have the honor to report the arrest of E. R. Rich,

of the 1st Md. Rebel Cavalry, on the charge of being a spy. He

came to this office to report and take the oath of allegiance,

but I think he did not come until he heard from his friend

Quinn, with whom he came to this city. I hand you herewith his

sworn statement, memoranda and pocket book, which show his

character.



You will also see an entry in his memoranda where Skinner

Quinn (now in prison) started for Baltimore last spring, which

corroborates Quinn's statement. You will also see that he

registered under several names.



The memorandum book shows that it was his intention to return

for good to Virginia.



Very respy. your obdt. servt,

H. B. SMITH,

Lt. & Chief.





Both Quinn and Rich were sentenced to be hanged, but their sentences

were finally commuted to imprisonment during the continuance of the

war.





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