Counterfeiters And The Arrest Of Mrs Beverly Tucker





Richmond had fallen, Lee had surrendered and the end was near.

Disbandment and readjustment, to a civil basis, was then in order.

Whatever work I did after this was of that character. I was no longer to

chase my dream of crippling Mosby. Probably he did not know I lived. He

might have smiled at my proposition, but I enjoyed the dream

nevertheless.





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Office Provost Marshal,

Baltimore, May 13, 1865.



Lieut. H. B. Smith.



Sir.--From what I can learn there are several gangs of

counterfeiters of United States currency in this city, driving

a good trade. I had the name and description of one of them

but have lost it.



I now find that a certain John Mitchell (whom I know) engaged

with a huxter in Washington, D. C., by name Henry High, knows

all the particulars.



Mitchell will not come to this city as he is afraid of being

arrested, upon what charge I do not know.



Yours,

WM. L. HOPKINS.





This was a new field for me and I delved into the matter with success.

Counterfeit money, in slang, is called "queer," and those who pass it on

the public are called "shovers." Its manufacturer never "shoves" it, but

sells it in quantities to small shop keepers, car conductors, and

others, at a certain percentage of its face value--50 per cent. quite

usually; the percentage, however, depends on whether it is well done or

not.



Ramsey, at No. 146 Sixth Street, below Race Street, Philadelphia, was a

medium. It was represented that the headquarters of the product was at

Mahanoy City, Pa. I bought twenty-five dollars, face value, in

twenty-five cent fractional currency very well done.



This was now a matter to be submitted to the Treasury Department, which

I accordingly did, which was the reason for the following:





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Office Provost Marshal,

Baltimore, June 15, 1865.



Special Order No. 86.



1st Lieut. H. B. Smith, Assistant Provost Marshal, will

immediately proceed to Washington, D. C., for the purpose of

conferring with the Hon H. McCullogh, Secretary of the

Treasury.



On accomplishing the object of his visit, he will immediately

report to these headquarters.



By command of Major General Wallace.



JOHN WOOLLEY,

Lt. Col & Pro. Marshal.



Lieut. H. B. Smith,

Asst. Provost Marshal.









Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Office Provost Marshal,

Baltimore, May 25, 1865.

12 P. M.



Lt. H. B. Smith,

Asst. Provost Marshal.



You will proceed to the Norfolk Boat, "Lary Line," foot of

Frederick Street, to-morrow morning, with a guard of one

officer and twenty men, and carry out the instructions given

you in compliance with orders of the Hon. Secretary of War.



By command of Major General Wallace.



JOHN WOOLLEY,

Lt. Col. & Pro. Marshal.





The above was an interesting case. The party to be apprehended was a

young officer, described as very youthful in appearance, who had shot

and killed a private soldier under very aggravating circumstances. He

ordered the soldier to do a menial service, and killed him for refusing.



The steamboat had three hundred or four hundred passengers. We did not

want to delay innocent persons, so I allowed all to pass off who were of

age sufficient to warrant the conclusion that they were not wanted. Then

I searched the boat and found a mere boy who appeared to be not over

fourteen years old; he was the one wanted. He had been tried and

convicted, and was on his way to jail (I think the Albany penitentiary)

when he escaped. We started him on again under a guard. When in the

Thirtieth Street station of the Hudson River Railroad, in New York City,

he was permitted to go into a water closet alone. He never came out the

door. He must have crawled out through the window, though it seemed not

large enough to permit even a boy's egress. The guards became frightened

and deserted. No one ever heard of either prisoner or guards so far as

I know. This boy officer was certainly living a charmed life.





Headquarters, Middle Department,

8th Army Corps.

Office Provost Marshal,

Baltimore, May 25, 1865.



Mrs. Beverly Tucker will be arrested. Seize and search her

baggage for papers, and also cause strict examination to be

made to discover any papers concealed on her person. Much

depends on your diligence and skill in executing this order.



Watch carefully what companions she has, if any, male or

female, and cause similar search to be made of such persons.



By command of Major General Wallace.



JOHN WOOLLEY,

Lt. Col. & Pro. Marshal.



To

Lt. H. B. Smith,

Asst. Provost Marshal.





Confederate Colonel Harry Gilmor The Raider Telling How He Did Not Come Back As A Conquering Hero; Of The Sword He Never Received; Of His Capture Dramatic Incident At Fort Mchenry facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

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