Military Maps





Definition. A military map is a drawing made to represent some

section of the country, showing the features that are of military

importance, such as roads, bridges, streams, houses, and hills. The map

must be so drawn that you can tell the distance between any two points,

the heights of the hills, and the relative positions of everything

shown. (Field Service Regulations.)



In the field the military maps are supplemented by sketches, or field

maps, prepared from day to day. For facility in reading, military maps

are made according to a uniform system of scales and contour intervals

as follows:



Road Sketches. Three inches on the map is equal to 1 mile on the

ground, contour intervals of 20 feet.



Position and Outpost Sketches. Six inches on the map arc equal to 1

mile on the ground, contour intervals of 10 feet.



Manoeuver or War Game Maps. Twelve inches on the map are equal to 1

mile on the ground, contour intervals of 5 feet.



Large Strategical maps for Extended Manoeuvers. One inch on the map is

equal to 1 mile on the ground, contour intervals of 60 feet.



Every officer in the Reserve Corps should be able to read a military map

and make a road, an outpost, and a position sketch.





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