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Military Maps





Definition. A military map is a drawing made to represent some
section of the country, showing the features that are of military
importance, such as roads, bridges, streams, houses, and hills. The map
must be so drawn that you can tell the distance between any two points,
the heights of the hills, and the relative positions of everything
shown. (Field Service Regulations.)

In the field the military maps are supplemented by sketches, or field
maps, prepared from day to day. For facility in reading, military maps
are made according to a uniform system of scales and contour intervals
as follows:

Road Sketches. Three inches on the map is equal to 1 mile on the
ground, contour intervals of 20 feet.

Position and Outpost Sketches. Six inches on the map arc equal to 1
mile on the ground, contour intervals of 10 feet.

Manoeuver or War Game Maps. Twelve inches on the map are equal to 1
mile on the ground, contour intervals of 5 feet.

Large Strategical maps for Extended Manoeuvers. One inch on the map is
equal to 1 mile on the ground, contour intervals of 60 feet.

Every officer in the Reserve Corps should be able to read a military map
and make a road, an outpost, and a position sketch.





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